Semantic Technology with a Reverse Twist

June 29, 2012

Semantic technology just got a little twisted, but not in a bad way. RolfROLLE explains multiple ways to look at semantics in his blog, ‘RECON 2012 Keynote: The Case for Semantics-Based Methods in Reverse Engineering’ on OpenRCE.org.

A bit of insight into Rolf’s view:

“The goal of my RECON 2012 keynote speech was to introduce methods in academic program analysis and demonstrate — intuitively, without drawing too much on formalism — how they can be used to solve practical problems that are interesting to industrial researchers in the real world. Given that it was the keynote speech, and my goal of making the material as accessible as possible, I attempted to make my points with pictures instead of dense technical explanations.”

The method behind the madness can be found in Rolf’s PDF Semantic based Methods, where he fine tunes his opinions with graphs and examples for visual aid. The presentation introduces a binary program analysis, as opposed to mathematical monograph and clarifies the difference between Semantics and Syntactic.

Setting mathematical equations aside and simplifying the results in layman’s terms shows us that semantic methods move slower, but are by far more detailed than syntactic methods. By providing the completeness of phase semantics, the referenced work strives to prove the correctness of trace semantics. When reflecting on the concept overall, it indeed shows semantic technology with an interesting new twist.

Jennifer Shockley, June 29, 2012

Sponsored by IKANOW

Comments

One Response to “Semantic Technology with a Reverse Twist”

  1. The Case for Semantics-Based Methods in Reverse Engineering « Another Word For It on July 1st, 2012 5:47 pm

    [...] Jennifer Shockley quotes Rolf as saying: “The goal of my RECON 2012 keynote speech was to introduce methods in academic program analysis and demonstrate — intuitively, without drawing too much on formalism — how they can be used to solve practical problems that are interesting to industrial researchers in the real world. Given that it was the keynote speech, and my goal of making the material as accessible as possible, I attempted to make my points with pictures instead of dense technical explanations.” [...]