Another University Jumps on the Social Media Analytics Bandwagon

July 3, 2012

Digimind’s Web Intelligence Blog recently reported on a new partnership with the Faculty of Business and Law at De Montfort University in order to prepare the next generation of competitive intelligence students in the article “Digimind Partners With De Montfort Univeristy.”

According to the article, this partnership was initiated in order to introduce Strategic Marketing students to research techniques that are used by today’s intelligence practitioners. The hope is that it will help prepare them for their future careers by letting them use Digimind’s automated software platform.

Dr. Sheila Wright, the spearheader of the initiative, stated:

“By giving students access to the Digimind platform we’re giving them experience of the real world as well as opening their eyes to the range of sources available beyond Google. I want to prepare students for the daily reality of working in an intelligence department by giving them access to the tools needed to build real-time information dashboards, competitor benchmarks and company profiles. The skills the students acquire throughout the course offer them a distinct advantage in today’s competitive job market.”

It appears that Digimind has a new positioning and it is Marketing Intelligence. The question we have is, is this about education and learning or revenue generation? perhaps, it is some combination of the two.

Jasmine Ashton, July 3, 2012

Sponsored by PolySpot

Comments

2 Responses to “Another University Jumps on the Social Media Analytics Bandwagon”

  1. Orlaith FINNEGAN on July 3rd, 2012 4:49 am

    It’s Orlaith here from Digimind. I’m a big fan of your blog and I wanted to respond to a couple of points raised in this article. Firstly in relation to your observation that Digimind ‘has a new positioning and it’s marketing intelligence’. While Digimind provides software that is routinely used by Competitive Intelligence professionals, it also serves a much broader field of professionals working in marketing, research, information management, R&D, and business development. When it comes to exploiting vast amounts of digital information our software tool does not solely address the needs of CI professionals, so we often talk about market intelligence, marketing, sales intelligence and market research as just some of the other areas that can benefit from our software.

    In relation to our alliance with De Montfort University, our partnership was inspired by a desire to strengthen the interaction between industry and university. If companies pursued this type of partnership as a revenue generating scheme, then I’m afraid it would be a failure from the beginning. The benefits that flow from closer ties between industry and higher education undoubtedly bring value to all involved. But it goes deeper than the balance sheet.

  2. Orlaith on July 3rd, 2012 4:52 am

    It’s Orlaith here from Digimind. I’m a big fan of your site, I’m usually lurking around, but this might be the first time I’ve jumped in with a comment. I just wanted to respond to a couple of points raised in this post. Firstly in relation to your observation that “Digimind has a new positioning and it’s marketing intelligence”…. While Digimind provides software that is routinely used by Competitive Intelligence professionals, it also serves a much broader range of professionals working in marketing, research, information management, R&D, and business development. When it comes to exploiting vast amounts of digital information our software tool does not solely address the needs of CI professionals, so we often talk about market intelligence, sales intelligence and market research as just some of the other areas that can benefit from our software. One of our challenges is to communicate the numerous applications of the Digimind tool, outside the sphere of Competitive Intelligence, without appearing to spread ourselves too thinly.

    In relation to our alliance with De Montfort University, our partnership was inspired by a desire to strengthen the interaction between industry and university. If companies pursued this type of partnership as a revenue generating scheme, then I’m afraid it would be a failure from the beginning. The benefits that flow from closer ties between industry and higher education undoubtedly bring value to all involved, but it goes deeper than the balance sheet.