Exploit Checklist for Bad Actors

July 28, 2021

I found this post my MIT Research (oops, sorry, I meant MITRE Research. The information in “2021 CWE Top 25 Most Dangerous Software Weaknesses” is fascinating. It provides hot links to details in a public facing encyclopedia called Common Weakness Enumeration. The link is to additional information about the Out-of-Bounds Write” weak point. The Top 25 is a helpful reference for good actors as well as bad actors. The MITRE team provides this preface to the list:

The 2021 Common Weakness Enumeration (CWE™) Top 25 Most Dangerous Software Weaknesses (CWE Top 25) is a demonstrative list of the most common and impactful issues experienced over the previous two calendar years. These weaknesses are dangerous because they are often easy to find, exploit, and can allow adversaries to completely take over a system, steal data, or prevent an application from working. The CWE Top 25 is a valuable community resource that can help developers, testers, and users — as well as project managers, security researchers, and educators — provide insight into the most severe and current security weaknesses. To create the 2021 list, the CWE Team leveraged Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE®) data found within the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) National Vulnerability Database (NVD), as well as the Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) scores associated with each CVE record. A formula was applied to the data to score each weakness based on prevalence and severity.

Popular weaknesses, the equivalent of a 1960s AM radio station’s “Fast Mover Tunes” are:

  • CWE-276 (Incorrect Default Permissions): from #41 to #19
  • CWE-306 (Missing Authentication for Critical Function): from #24 to #11
  • CWE-502 (Deserialization of Untrusted Data): from #21 to #13
  • CWE-862 (Missing Authorization): from #25 to #18
  • CWE-77 (Improper Neutralization of Special Elements used in a Command (‘Command Injection’)): from #31 to #25

New entries are:

  • CWE-276 (Incorrect Default Permissions): from #41 to #19
  • CWE-918 (Server-Side Request Forgery (SSRF)): from #27 to #24
  • CWE-77 (Improper Neutralization of Special Elements used in a Command (‘Command Injection’)): from #31 to #25

A few minutes spent with this list can be instructive. The write up includes a list of weaknesses which one might want to know about.

Net net: Who will find this list more inspirational: Marketing oriented cyber threat vendors or bad actors working under the protection of nation states hostile to US interests?

Stephen E Arnold, July 28, 2021

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