HSSCM Method: October 11, 2018 Google Item

October 12, 2018

I read “Google Home Hub—Under the Hood, It’s Nothing Like Other Google Smart Displays.”

In that interesting write up, I noted a remark which adds to the high school science club management methods I have been compiling.

First, let’s look at the statement, then I will extract the HSSCM method.

The statement:

When asked why Google was using a totally different platform from the third parties, Jolly told me, “There’s no particular reason. We just felt we could bring the experience to bear with Cast, and the experiences are the same. We would have easily given the third-parties Cast if they wanted it, but I think most developers are comfortable using Android Things.”

What’s the management method?

Here it is:

There’s no particular reason.

Yes, Google takes actions without having a “particular reason.” That is an interesting and, in my view, subjective way to approach significant technical approaches. Meh, no reason.

But there’s another HSSCM method tucked into the passage. Did you spot it? Notice this:

We just felt we could bring the experience to bear with Cast, and the experiences are the same.

The HSSCM method seems to be to avoid using data. Nope, just use feelings. Feelings are justification enough for a decision which may have an effect on partners and vendors. Meh, just feelings.

Plus, there is a third HSSCM method in the statement. Give up? Here it is:

I think most developers are comfortable using Android Things.

The HSSCM method is to make assumptions about how other humanoids perceive Google decisions. What about the “developers”? What exactly does comfortable mean to a developer?

The HSSCM methods extracted from this allegedly accurate quote from a Googler are:

  1. One does not have to have a reason for a decision.
  2. Feelings, not data, justify a decision.
  3. Assumptions about other people are more important than what those individuals say.

Quite a bountiful harvest of management methods. Let’s implement them today because without data, gut instinct, and inputs from other people, we can be agile and surprising. The upside is significant.

Downsides? Not important.

Consistency is the hobgoblin of small minds. Wait. Isn’t Amazon consistent with its home devices?

Stephen E Arnold, October 11, 2018

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