New ArnoldIT Search Video: Jargon and Its Impact

April 23, 2014

Stephen E Arnold’s new enterprise search video is no online. You can view the six minute video via YouTube. The lingo and argot generated by enterprise search vendors helps make sales. An unfortunate side effect is confusion and obfuscation. Is a product really a “killer”? Do you need linguistics, semantics, and analytics to find a presentation by the CEO? The short video, based on a talk given by Mr. Arnold at a conference in Boston several years ago, strikes at the heart of a fundamental problem for procurement teams—Figuring out exactly what a system can really do.

Kenneth Toth, April 23, 2014

Small Analytics Firms Reaping the Benefit of Investment Cycle

April 23, 2014

Small time analytics isn’t really as startup-y as people may think anymore. These companies are in high demand and are pulling in some serious cash. We discovered just how much and how serious from a recent Cambridge Science Park article, “Cambridge Text Analytics Linguamatics Hits $10m in Sales.”

According to the story:

Linguamatics’ sales showed strong growth and exceeded ten million dollars in 2013, it was announced today – outperforming the company’s targeted growth and expected sales figures.  The increased sales came from a boost in new customers and increased software licenses to existing customers in the pharmaceutical and healthcare sectors. This included 130 per cent growth in healthcare sales plus increased sales in professional services.

This earning potential has clearly grabbed the attention of investors. This, is feeding a cycle of growth, which is why the Linguamaticses of the world can rake in impressive numbers. Just the other day, for example, Tech Circle reported on a microscopic Mumbai big data company that landed $3m in investments. They say it takes money to make money and right now, the world of big data analytics has that cycle down pat. It won’t last forever, but it’s fun to watch as it does.

Patrick Roland, April 23, 2014

Sponsored by ArnoldIT.com, developer of Augmentext

Google Wisely Going Slow with Glass

April 23, 2014

Beta testing technology is never pretty. The first Apple computer was famously housed inside a wooden shell, for instance. Often times, we are impatient for our new toys to fully evolve, which is why someone like Google has a graveyard of forgotten offerings. However, they seem content to let Google Glass grow naturally, especially after releasing a hilarious photo recently in Business Insider’s article, “What Google Glass Looked Like Three Years Ago.”

The picture features a Google Glass that looks closer to a proton pack than a mobile search device. As the article comments:

There’s hope for those who are intrigued by the idea of Google Glass but, for vanity’s sake, wouldn’t wear today’s version in a million years. In three more years, Google Glass will probably look like Ray-Bans!

We are equally optimistic that the Google Glass that is released to the public will not be the gawky frames we know today. That’s why we like the time the company is taking releasing the product. Unlike the days of, say, the Google Music Player which followed the Beta testing plan of throwing a product against a wall and if it sticks keep with it, otherwise abandon it. If Google wants to revolutionize mobile search, taking their sweet time with Glass is the right thing to do.

Patrick Roland, April 23, 2014

Sponsored by ArnoldIT.com, developer of Augmentext

SharePoint Information Governance Concerns

April 23, 2014

Most users of SharePoint know about the struggles and concerns of governance. CMS Wire covers the issue in their article, “The SharePoint Information Governance Problem.”

Speaking to those experienced with using SharePoint as a document management platform, the article begins:

“You’re also likely familiar with the negative impacts that typically result from using SharePoint ineffectively: a proliferation of sites, often on a proliferation of SharePoint versions, with no clear standards on what documents should (and shouldn’t) be stored there or how, no clear guidelines for users on how to classify their documents, little to no capabilities for promoting effective information lifecycle management, little to no end user governance or oversight for things like site and document library structures, security and access settings, or document hygiene, and dozens, hundreds or even thousands of orphaned sites that, taken together, represent a digital landfill of staggering proportions.”

The article then goes on to assert that most of these issues are due to SharePoint’s lack of ease of use. This is a topic that Stephen E. Arnold often covers on his information site, ArnoldIT.com. Specializing in all forms of search, Arnold has a lifetime of experience. Tune in to his SharePoint feed for tips and tricks on increasing ease of use.

Emily Rae Aldridge, April 23, 2014

Glass: Looking through the Obvious

April 22, 2014

I read “How Google Screwed Up Google Glass.” The capitalist tool does not have its heart in the analysis. Here’s the tip off: “It really is a great idea.”

What exactly is great about a virtual reality headset? As I wrote in Information Today, I have two or three devices that connect on my shelves. What became of them? Not too much.

In my view, Glass is less about wearing crazy eye glasses and more about dragging red herrings across real journalists’ paths, than a different play. I a report I prepared for an investment bank, I focused on the technology which is used to create the headgear and the contact lens demonstration.

The key figure in this technology is a fellow named Dr. Amir Parviz (aka Babak Parvis, Babak Parviz, Babak Amirparviz, and other variations). He studied at the elbow of Dr. George Whitesides at Harvard. This dynamic duo has demonstrated some chemistry in their research and patents. The contact lens work has roots which reach back to Dr. Parviz’s days at the University of Washington and its research group.

I am not going to rehash the information presented in the Information Today article and the financial institution’s report. Suffice it to say that Glass is less about wearing wonky headgear and more about nanoengineering. Is this self assembly work related to robots. By the way, yummy photos of Google’s X Lab at http://read.bi/1hkHTKl do not include the biomedical facilities. Slight oversight or Loon misdirection?

Seeing through Glass is important. There are strong personal motivations for Google’s top dogs behind the biological engineering research. Maybe running a query on Glass will sharpen the focus?

Stephen E Arnold, April 22, 2014

Hakia Building Momentum Again

April 22, 2014

Hakia has been a little quiet lately, but that doesn’t mean the upstart search engine isn’t still gaining fans. We found a really enthusiastic review in a recent Christiano Kewna post, “Proof! Haika.com Works Better than Google Search on Long Tail Keyphrases.”

According to Kwena:

If you are searching using natural language phrases, then I urge you to check out Hakia.com. You can still revert back to Google for some other searches, but if you have a 10 word phrase that you are searching for, then the big Giant Google will likely take you round and round.

Actually, things aren’t so quiet around Hakia headquarters. According to a recent PR Newswire piece, Hakia partnered with FLOW to work on social media marketing. According to one exec, “We are excited that Flow has chosen to integrate [Hakia] into its social commerce platform. We expect many other technology innovators to move in this direction.” We think the world of Hakia and look forward to them making routine splashes again. This is one of the sharpest enterprise search companies on the block and always worth watching.

Patrick Roland, April XX, 2014

Sponsored by ArnoldIT.com, developer of Augmentext

Small Analytics Firms Reaping the Benefit of Investment Cycle

April 22, 2014

Small time analytics isn’t really as startup-y as people may think anymore. These companies are in high demand and are pulling in some serious cash. We discovered just how much and how serious from a recent Cambridge Science Park article, “Cambridge Text Analytics Linguamatics Hits $10m in Sales.”

According to the story:

Linguamatics’ sales showed strong growth and exceeded ten million dollars in 2013, it was announced today – outperforming the company’s targeted growth and expected sales figures.  The increased sales came from a boost in new customers and increased software licenses to existing customers in the pharmaceutical and healthcare sectors. This included 130 per cent growth in healthcare sales plus increased sales in professional services.

This earning potential has clearly grabbed the attention of investors. This, is feeding a cycle of growth, which is why the Linguamaticses of the world can rake in impressive numbers. Just the other day, for example, Tech Circle reported on a microscopic Mumbai big data company that landed $3m in investments. They say it takes money to make money and right now, the world of big data analytics has that cycle down pat. It won’t last forever, but it’s fun to watch as it does.

Patrick Roland, April 22, 2014

Sponsored by ArnoldIT.com, developer of Augmentext

SharePoint Video at SPTechCon

April 22, 2014

The SharePoint Technology Conference takes place in San Francisco, starting today and running through the end of the week. Virtual Strategy covers some of the vendors and exhibitors in their article, “SharePoint-Videos.com Invites the SharePoint Community to Visit Booth 607 at SPTechCon in San Francisco.”

The article begins:

“SharePoint-Videos.com (SPVideos), provider of online SharePoint training, consulting and end user support, will exhibit at SPTechCon, San Francisco next week. From Thursday, April 24 – Friday, April 25, SharePoint-Videos.com invites attendees to stop by booth 607 for a number of exciting activities.”

Stephen E. Arnold of ArnoldIT.com is a longtime leader in search and covers not only SharePoint, but also the third-party solutions that users are increasingly turning to. He finds that companies like SharePoint-Videos can improve adoption and efficiency as they can simplify the bulky and complicated software so that users and managers are more confident and satisfied.

Emily Rae Aldridge, April 22, 2014

Open Source Search: Just Like Good Old Proprietary Search

April 21, 2014

The last few days have given me some food for thought. I read”Splunk Exec Defects to Tech Disruptor ElasticSearch.” The article points out:

Elastisearch co-founder and chief technology officer, Shay Banon, said the company focus was all about products. “Elasticsearch is building something bigger than any one technology and so I’m excited to have someone like Gaurav [a former Googler] on board, who shares our vision and is going to play an instrumental role in taking our products to the next level,” he said. In the past four months, the company launched its first commercial product, Elasticsearch Marvel….Bloomberg, The New York Times, Facebook, GitHub, Netflix, Yelp, Verizon, McGraw-Hill, WordPress, Atlassian and SoundCloud all use Elasticsearch to store, search and analyze any type of data in real time.

Poor Splunk. The company offers tools to help licensees “listen to their data.” First, Lucid leaves one writer with the impression that felonious behavior is coming down the Information Highway. Splunk was the target of some enthusiastic writer at the IDC combine who apparently became entangled in some Mad Men type of advertising. That article appeared in InfoWorld as “LucidWorks Preps Solr Stack as Splunk Killer.” Now ElasticSearch has allegedly hired a Splunk wizard to herd products down the busy digital trail.

What I find interesting is that open source search is starting to look more like the good old proprietary enterprise search sector. Me too products and executive churn mix with MBA think. The lingering effects of search controversies past like those swirling around Fast Search and Autonomy remain fresh in my mind.

Will ElasticSearch and Lucid Works become the new combatants in the search sector? Today both companies have chosen Splunk as the punching bag.

The more search changes, the more it remains the same it seems. Come to think of it: Most of today’s vendors are following the scripts written for Fulcrum Technologies and Verity who stomped around the C suite in the 1980s. Is the search sector running an endless loop?

Stephen E Arnold, April 21, 2014

Google Promptly and Quietly Erases Lists of Government Partners

April 21, 2014

A pair of articles at PandoDaily tell an interesting story. First they published a piece titled, “Google Distances Itself from the Pentagon, Stays in Bed with Mercenaries and Intelligence Contractors.” In that article, reporter Yasha Levine reveals that, despite Google’s attempts to dissociate itself from the military-industrial complex after last year’s NSA kerfuffle, the search giant is still working closely with several of those agencies, and their contractors. He writes:

“In some cases — like the company’s dealings with the NSA and its sister agency, the NGA — Google deals with government agencies directly. But in recent years, Google has increasingly taken the role of subcontractor: selling its wares to military and intelligence agencies by partnering with established military contractors. It’s a very deliberate strategy on Google’s part, allowing it to more effectively sink its hooks into the nepotistic, old boy government networks of America’s military-intelligence-industrial complex.

“Over the past decade, Google Federal (as the company’s DC operation is called) has partnered up with old school establishment military contractors like Lockheed Martin, as well as smaller boutique outfits — including one closely connected to the CIA and former mercenary firm, Blackwater.”

Levine goes into detail, and that article is an interesting read. However, it was his follow-up piece, “Google Apparently Scrubs Military Contractor Partner Listing, After Pando Report” that really caught our attention. This story shares screenshots taken before and after the revelatory article was posted a couple days before. These images show Google’s Enterprise- Government page displaying lists of government partners. The second shows a page in perpetual-load mode. Levine tells us:

“Later [on the day the first article was posted], I noticed a strange thing: The official Google ‘Enterprise Government’ webpage that had listed some of the company’s military contractor partners no longer loaded. The page worked just fine less than a week ago, but now all it shows is some text up top telling government agencies to ditch their dinosaur IT services and get with Google — ‘Help your agency move fast and innovate’! — and then nothing but empty white space….

“I’ve asked several people to access the page from different parts of the United States and they all come back with the same answer: the page framework partially loads, but all the information is missing. It appears to be the only Google Enterprise page that does not load. I’ve looked around, but could not find this missing list of contractors displayed anywhere else on the Google Enterprise website.”

So, was this glitch purposeful? Well, as of this writing, the page is functioning. However, it no longer includes lists of partners, just links to more info for potential customers. Like Levine, I can find no such list elsewhere on the site. (The closest I found is a page where city reps laud Google for use in running local governments — much less controversial.) Good catch, Pando.

Cynthia Murrell, April 21, 2014

Sponsored by ArnoldIT.com, developer of Augmentext

Next Page »