Enterprise Partnership Announced

August 2, 2013

The shift to unified information access is occurring throughout the enterprise search market. In order to make that shift more seamless and effective Attivio has partnered with Capax Global. Read all about the partnership in the article, “Capax Global and Attivio Announce Strategic Reseller Partnership.”

The article begins:

Attivio, creator of the award-winning Active Intelligence Engine (AIE), has formed a strategic reseller partnership with Capax Global, a recognised leader in enterprise search and critical business technology consulting. The partnership addresses the changing needs of Capax Global’s customers as they deal with the widespread shift from traditional enterprise search to unified information access (UIA).”

Unified information access addresses both Big Data and unstructured data. Users are looking for a way to intuitively interact with their data in a way that produces meaning but does not disregard the user experience. LucidWorks, and other value-added open source enterprise providers, seek these same objectives through the use of open source infrastructure. LucidWorks relies on the power of Apache Lucene Solr to keep its customers satisfied at a low cost of both time and money.

Emily Rae Aldridge, August 2, 2013

Sponsored by ArnoldIT.com, developer of Beyond Search

Redesigning Enterprise Architecture at Gartner Catalyst Conference

August 1, 2013

The announcement has been made that Chris Haddad will deliver a presentation at the Gartner Catalyst Conference which concludes today in San Diego, California. Read more in the press release on PR Web, “WSO2 Vice President of Technology Evangelism to Speak on Redesigning Enterprise Architecture at Gartner Catalyst Conference 2013.”

The release begins:

“WSO2 today announced that WSO2 Vice President of Technology Evangelism Chris Haddad will deliver a presentation at the Gartner Catalyst Conference 2013, ‘Driving Enterprise Architecture Redesign: Cloud-Native Platforms, APIs, and DevOps.’ WSO2 is a platinum sponsor of the Gartner Catalyst Conference, which will run July 29 – August 1, 2013 at the Manchester Grand Hyatt in San Diego, CA.”

The talk should give some insight into the three fundamental drivers that power current enterprise architecture: cloud platforms, APIs, and DevOps. Many open source enterprise solutions providers, like LucidWorks, seek to incorporate these technologies into their software, ensuring flexibility and intuitiveness. LucidWorks Big Data and LucidWorks Search are both built on a solid base of Apache Lucene Solr, and incorporate a variety of leading technologies like Hadoop.

Emily Rae Aldridge, August 1, 2013

Sponsored by ArnoldIT.com, developer of Beyond Search

Business Efficiency to Increase with Semantic Search

July 23, 2013

Looking for an alternative to Google and other big-name web search platforms? Teach Amazing recommends “Hakia—Semantic Search Portal.” Writer Mark Brumley explains that the semantic web search portal presents multiple types of content in the same results page. The various sections encompass the gamut and this type of aggregated search displayed on a single point of access seems to be the wave of the future.

Brumley shares his user experience:

I love how search results are displayed. Various sections are populated on a single page. Sections include web, news, blogs, Twitter, images and videos. The Twitter feed is a real plus for me and gives an indication of the current pulse of a particular topic. Give Hakia a try the next time you are doing some research. Make sure you try it in the classroom as well. Students need to know that Google is not the only search provider on the planet.

Brumley is not alone in recognizing the advantages of parsing data with context and meaning that semantic search provides. The enterprise also functions more efficiently when using tools that take a semantic approach to data. For example, Expert System offers solutions that empowers users to work at new heights of discovery and collaboration.

Megan Feil,  July 23, 2013

Sponsored by ArnoldIT.com, developer of Beyond Search.

Google and Its Enterprise Push: Changes Ahead?

July 23, 2013

I read “Google Will Invest More in Enterprise Business.” The story reported, “More than half of Fortune 500 companies are paying for Google enterprise products, and 5 million companies are using Google Apps for Business.” The story added:

Google’s deepening ties with HP could also help it crack into more enterprise accounts. HP is selling a Chromebook and is using Android for two of its tablets. Google and HP are also partnering on SMB IT In a Box, which bundles Google Apps with HP PCs and printers.

One important factoid in the write up was the assertion that Google’s cloud business and its applications business was generating about $200 million in the most recent quarter. Assuming that the figure is accurate, Google is on track to generate about $1 billion from its enterprise services. If the company ends the current fiscal year in the $60 billion in revenue range, the enterprise unit will make up one minute  of 60 minutes of Google revenue.

Google may be using its own predictive system to help guide its decision to push into the enterprise. The UK Telegraph reported some interesting information about online ads and user behavior. “Study: Users Don’t Click on Online Ads” said:

An academic study concluded that brand adverts in internet searches have “no short-term bene?ts”, and added that “returns from all other keywords are a fraction of conventional estimates.” Byron Sharp, Professor of Marketing Science at the University of South Australia tweeted, “Google won’t like this”….With much of the web funded by advertising, and more advertising needed to make mobile pay, it seems that web business is becoming even more difficult.

Google has been working in the enterprise sector for a decade, maybe longer. There have been a number of initiatives, managers, and products. Perhaps now that Microsoft seems to be in the midst of some management change, Google thinks the time is right to ramp up its enterprise business? If ad revenue is no longer the sure thing it was, Google and other online advertising firms will have to step up their monetization efforts and probably take other actions users may not enjoy; for example, raising prices. Will Google boost prices for the Google Search Appliance, Google Apps, or Cloud Services?

Stephen E Arnold, July 23, 2013

Sponsored by Xenky

Acquisition of Gigablast by Yippy Leaves Some Questions Unanswered

July 19, 2013

An article on Yahoo titled Yippy, Inc. (YIPI) to Acquire Gigablast, Inc. And Web Research Properties, LLC to Expand Consumer Search, Enterprise, and eDiscovery Products reported on the important acquisition by the young company. Yippy, Inc. is a search clustering tech company based in Florida with some innovative eDiscovery resources. Matt Wells, the founder of Gigablast states in the article,

“Gigablast and its related properties can provide advanced technologies for consumer, eDiscovery, and enterprise big data customers.  Gigabits, a related program, is the first operational enterprise class clustering program which I put into service in 2004.  Yippy’s Velocity platform was essentially based off of my original work which will allow Yippy to sell behind the firewall installations for all types of search based applications for enterprise and eDiscovery customers.”

Yippy’s Chief Executive Rich Granville claims that the acquisition will not only benefit customers through technological innovation but by low costs. He directed interested parties to a demo that might illustrate the massive potential in the merger of these companies. The demo shows that the combined indexing of billions of pages of data has already begun, although not when it will be complete. What is less clear is who is indexing what in this tie-up?

Chelsea Kerwin, July 19, 2013

Sponsored by ArnoldIT.com, developer of Augmentext

Flawed Enterprise Information Solutions

July 8, 2013

It can be hard to get any insider information out of Microsoft, but Ahmet Alp Balkan is a young software engineer working at the aforementioned company. He started working at Windows Azure as an intern and he was hired right after college. Since working there he was learned a lot, much of which he did not glean from college. He tells what he learned about the business world in, “8 Months In Microsoft, I Learned These.” Some of the items he learned are quite startling and others will not even make you blink. For instance, everyone learns at some point that they are working for someone else to earn their paycheck, they also have to step outside their specialty comfort zones, getting the job done, is the most important, and the latest upgrades are usually skipped.

What is alarming is this:

“Expect no documentation in corporations. I have seen the knowledge inside the company is mostly transferred by talking and hands-on sessions. Some parts of knowledge base generated are only emailed and not saved anywhere permanent. This is not how the information flows in the digital world. There are certain people, if they got hit by a bus, nobody can pick up their work or code. And it is okay. If this would have been my own company there would be tons of wiki pages.”

Also the mentality that it is  more about what you sell rather than what you do that matters. Money speaks and makes the world go around. This mentality demonstrates how corporate America has the blinders on. Is this an explanation about why there are some enterprise information solutions that are flawed? Or maybe why some search applications suck? Can anyone else say narrow-minded and lack of the big picture?

Whitney Grace, July 08, 2013

Sponsored by ArnoldIT.com, developer of Beyond Search

Oracle and Business Intelligence Reality

July 4, 2013

I don’t know if this Computerworld write up is accurate. For the purposes of the addled goose, let’s assume that it is semi-accurate. The story is “Oracle Quietly Slashes BI Software Prices.” Now “BI” for those in the know means “business intelligence.” I am not sure what “business intelligence” means. I have some evidence to suggest that, like “military intelligence,” we have a trendy oxymoron.

I am okay with stealthy price increases. Every time I visit the Kia dealership to fix up my small Kia Soul, I know that what I think the cost will be and what the final cost will be are two very different types of number tweaking. Is enterprise software any different? I think agile pricing is pretty much the name of the game. I bought two tubes of toothpaste. When I presented my “affiliate” card, the price dropped. Then I was told if I bought another tube of toothpaste, I would get an additional discount. Car repairs, toothpaste, enterprise software — those MBAs and bean counters have figured an angle.

slippery pricing copy copy

The point of the Computerworld write up is that Oracle (the company which owns Endeca) offers a business foundation suite. Endeca morphed from a search and eCommerce company into business intelligence years ago. The Computerworld story does not mention Endeca, which I find interesting. If one pays $1 billion or more for an acquisition which is in the business intelligence business, why isn’t Endeca part of the BI Foundation Suite?

Here’s the purportedly accurate pricing:

BI Foundation Suite encompasses Oracle BI Enterprise Edition 11g, BI Publisher, Essbase, Scorecard and Strategy Management, and Essbase Analytics Link, according to an official whitepaper. The new price list also lowers the price of BI Suite Enterprise Edition Plus from $295,000 to $221,250, as well as Scorecard and Strategy Management from $149,250 to $89,550.

The Computerworld story quotes an expert that there may be a catch in Oracle’s enterprise software pricing. Do you think that’s possible?

Another interesting item from the article is the unsupported assertion about Oracle’s revenue growth from business intelligence:

However, Oracle’s BI revenue grew by 2 percent in 2012, compared to SAP’s 0.6 percent BI growth rate that year, Gartner said.

The economy is not so good. Why is pricing such a slippery issue? Perhaps the growth is coming from efforts akin to climbing a mountain in bad weather? Maybe the traditional customers are struggling to find value from software which offers “business intelligence”?

My hunch is that like toothpaste pricing the economy is forcing big companies to increase their pricing agility. Maybe there will be an enterprise software loyalty card? If so, I want one. I am fascinated by cascading and fluid discounts.

Stephen E Arnold, July 4, 2013

Sponsored by Xenky

SharePoint and SharePoint Search: End of Life?

June 16, 2013

I had a chat with a former IBM executive. At lunch, an interesting emerged as we talked about the trials and tribulations large enterprise software vendors are facing. In addition to the embarrassing layoffs at IBM, there are signals that the financial screws are being turned at Hewlett Packard, Oracle, SAP and elsewhere. Part of the pressure is normal because the April May June quarter is an important one before the world goes on vacation in July and August. September, obviously, will be another flat out period for sales and marketing professionals. But there was one t hought which we kicked around in a post-prandial stupor.

A dilemma now exists in the enterprise software sector.

Stick with what works and has worked

Go in a new direction and improvise.

What happens if Microsoft does the Adobe thing and forces SharePoint licensees to embrace the cloud? What happens to the resellers? What happens to the integrators? What happens to the in house staff who know the intricacies of on premises installations of SharePoint but not the secrets of Azure?

warning sign dilemma ade copy copy

Microsoft has a significant dependence on on premises sales. This is the client access license, the enterprise license, and the special set ups which make Microsoft the de facto choice for desktop computing workers worldwide.

Is an end of life play for SharePoint possible without making Microsoft even more vulnerable to the enticements of Google and others who want to supplant Microsoft as the “king of the desktop enter” and “baron of the back office”?

On one hand, the idea that SharePoint and its okay search solution, administrator employing mail and database systems, and its quirky collaboration and document management solutions could shift to the cloud is silly. Why give up those license fees? Why alienate service firms dependent on sales and support to hundreds of millions of SharePoint users? Why assume that a cloud business model will work for on site license customers? Organizations are conservative. Change comes slowly or not at all. Stick with the status quo.

Read more

HP Autonomy Acronym Explained

June 15, 2013

Know what Haven means in HP Autonomy speak? At lunch yesterday, I learned that the acronym means:

H is for Hadoop, the dust bin for digital stuff

A is for Autonomy, the HP acquisition fueling MBA case studies

V is for Vertica, the HP big data analytics acquisition

E is for enterprise, the customer seeking refuge from other vendors

N is for… not sure, the one thing I know about big outfits.

If anyone knows if “N” is from enterprise or if “N” comes from some other nifty buzzword or product, use the comments to fill a void in the goose’s acronym blank space.

Stephen E Arnold, June 15, 2013

Sponsored by Xenky, the portal for ArnoldIT

The Negative Side Of Enterprise Software

May 23, 2013

You like, you hate it, you love it, you loathe it. These seem to be the common conceptions when it comes to enterprise software. Despite all the praise enterprise software has garnered, Glider takes a look at “Why Enterprise Software Sucks: 6 years Later,” a retrospect on an article from 2007.

Back in 2007, enterprise software’s biggest problem was the software buyers were not the end users. The buyers just needed to fulfill the requirements and a good user experience was optional. Fast forward to the present day, things are better…somewhat. Users are able to cut out the middleman and buy their own product as well as more user-friendly software. Companies are still facing slow adoption of the better product. Why? They are running off legacy systems and are afraid to touch them in case it should fail. Then there is the trust factor, companies hear about next technology, but are reluctant to try it. Once the crowd migrates over, so will everyone else.

Does enterprise software have a future? Yes, it does:

“The world at large is quickly growing accustomed to consumer internet (and mobile) applications. Everybody in the world is on Facebook. The average person has over 50 apps on their phone. It’s just a matter of time until they expect the same quality in the tools they use at work. The consumerization of enterprise will only grow stronger. The same can be said for bottom-up adoption.”

Enterprise is wanted, the mentality of the users just has to change to adopt it. If enterprise is “back,” are there lessons in this article for vendors of search, content processing and analytics systems aka the Big Data crowd? Or have they already learned from where enterprise software failed in the past?

Whitney Grace, May 23, 2013

Sponsored by ArnoldIT.com, developer of Beyond Search

« Previous PageNext Page »