The Cloud Needs EDiscovery Like Now

October 16, 2017

Cloud computing has changed the way home and enterprise systems store and access data.  One of the problems with cloud computing, however, is the lack of a powerful eDiscovery tool.  There are search tools for the cloud, but eDiscovery tools help users make rhyme and reason of their content.  Compare The Cloud reports that there is a new eDiscovery tool to improve the cloud, “KroLDiscovery Brings End-To-End eDiscovery To The Cloud With Nebula.”  Nebula is the name of KrolLDiscovery’s eDiscovery tool and it is an upgrade of eDirect365, building on the software’s processing and review capabilities.

Nebula was designed with a user-friendly eDiscovery approach that simplifies otherwise complex tasks.  Nebula is also a web-based application and it can be accessed from most browsers and mobile devices.  The benefit for Windows users is that it can be deployed within Windows Azure to bring scalability and rapid deployment capabilities.

KrolLDiscovery is proud of their newest product:

 ‘We are excited for the future of Nebula,; said Chris Weiler, President and CEO of KrolLDiscovery. ‘Expanding our eDiscovery capabilities to the cloud is a benefit to our multi-national and international clients as they can now process, store and access their data across the globe. All the while, we are dedicated to providing the same industry-leading service we are known for by our clients.’

Nebula was designed to improve how users interact and use their content on a cloud-based system.  Cloud computing has a real-time and portable air about it, but its weaknesses lie in lag and security.  Perhaps Nebula will enhance the former making its other weaknesses a mere shadow of the past.

Whitney Grace, October 16, 2017

 

The Narrowing App Market

September 29, 2017

If you are thinking of going into app development, first take a gander at this write-up; Business Insider reports, “Half of Digital Media Time Is Spent in Five Apps.” Citing comScore’s 2017 US Mobile App Report , writer Laurie Beaver tells us:

Users spend 90% of their mobile app time in their top five apps, making up 51% of total digital time spent. Perhaps more alarming is that half of the time spent on smartphones is within just one app. That drops dramatically to 18% of time for the second most used app. This suggests that unless a brand’s or business’ app is the first or second most used (most likely Facebook- or Google-owned), it’s unlikely to get any meaningful share of users’ attention.

There are a few reasons for developers to take heart—the number of app downloads is picking up, and users have become more willing to allow push notifications. Most importantly, perhaps, is that users are making in-app purchases; that is where most apps make their money. Beaver continues:

Nevertheless, the report shows the astonishing influence Facebook and Google have over how US mobile app users spend their time. And given the increasingly large share the top five apps have, it’s likely to only become more difficult for brands and publishers to receive any share of users’ time. Alternate app experiences such as Apple’s iMessage apps, Google’s Instant Apps, and Facebook Messenger’s Instant Games could provide brands and publishers with new avenues to reach consumers where they’re spending their time. While these services are nascent, they do provide a promising option for businesses moving forward.

We’re reminded that apps have gained ground over browsers, and are now the main way folks get online. However, the trends toward app consolidation and app abandonment may lead to a “post-app” future. Never fear, though—Business Insider’s research service, BI Intelligence, offers a report titled “The End of Apps” ($495) that could help businesses and developers prepare for the future. Founded in 2007, Business Insider is headquartered in New York City.

Cynthia Murrell, September 29, 2017

Amazon to Develop Pet Translating App

September 12, 2017

Anyone who has participated in a one-way conversation with their beloved pet can appropriate Amazon’s latest ambitions in creating an app to translate dog and cat sounds into human language. Not being the first to have this idea, Amazon should note that there has been no significant advance in this particular science and, perhaps, they are over-reaching even their own capacities.

The Guardian recently shared of Amazon’s dreams of a pet-translating app and came to the conclusion that at best it would provide the same service as adult supervision.

Kaminski says a translation device might make things easier for people who lack intuition or young children who misinterpret signals ‘sometimes quite significantly.’ One study, for instance, found that when young children were shown a picture of a dog with menacingly bared teeth, they concluded that the dog was “happy” and “smiling” and that they would like to hug it. An interpretation device might be able to warn of danger.

While there is no doubt that the pet industry is exploding in dollars and interest, Amazon’s app aspirations are a bit of a stretch. It is understandable how such a gimmicky app would set Amazon apart from other translation apps and sites, even if it has the same accuracy.

Catherine Lamsfuss, September 12, 2017

AI to Tackle Image Reading

September 11, 2017

The new frontier in analytics might just be pictures. Known to baffle even the most advanced AI systems, the ability to break pictures into recognizable parts and then use them to derive meaning has been a quest for many for some time. It appears that Disney Research in cahoots with UC Davis believe they are near a breakthrough.

Phys.org quotes Markus Gross, vice president at Disney Research, as saying,

We’ve seen tremendous progress in the ability of computers to detect and categorize objects, to understand scenes and even to write basic captions, but these capabilities have been developed largely by training computer programs with huge numbers of images that have been carefully and laboriously labeled as to their content. As computer vision applications tackle increasingly complex problems, creating these large training data sets has become a serious bottleneck.

A perfect example of the application of this is MIT attempts to use AI to share recipes and nutritional information just by viewing a picture of food. The sky is the limit when it comes to possibilities if Disney and MIT can help AI over the current hump of limitations.

Catherine Lamsfuss, September 11, 2017

Google to Further Predict Relevant News to Subscribers

August 30, 2017

It’s no surprise that these days most people rely on something other than themselves to find relevant news stories, be it social media, a news feed or even Google. For many, it’s easier to let others determine what is truly important. Google, a leader in pointing out useful information and news, has stepped up their steering game and announce the update to their app which will further think for each user.

According to a recent liliputing article,

…the feed still shows things like news, videos, and sports scores. But Google isn’t just choosing content based on the way you interact with Google search, apps, and services anymore. The company will also surface items that are trending locally and around the globe, helping you stay up to date on things that you might otherwise have missed. The company says it uses machine learning algorithms to predict which things you’ll be most interested in seeing.

For those uncomfortable with only seeing news stories Google’s algorithms deem worthy of your consideration there are steps you can take to delete your preferences and habits. Perhaps Google’s intentions are altruistic and the app will be Big Brother approved really helpful to the masses. We sure hope so!

Catherine Lamsfuss, August 30, 2017

Optimizing the Noisy Internet

July 28, 2017

Humans love to complain, especially the older generations about how their youth was superior to the current day.  Alan Franzoni rants about how the Internet has gotten too noisy in “Stopping The Internet Noise-A Useful Internet Back Again.”  Franzoni complains that the modern Internet is not as useful as the Internet of the 56K modem days.  He lists the ways the old Internet was more productive.  He starts with old Usenet discussion groups and mailing lists.  What he liked about this old discussion boards were that he could subscribe to one application service instead of having to do it multiple times.  He then turns to IRC chatting, citing its superiority because it was a single application with a consistent interface.

He bemoans the loss of Google Reader, which is an actual loss.  The ability to read all of your daily Web sites in one consistent feed was nice.  What Franzoni hates is that he cannot mark things as reading, there is zero to little API, and there is not any focus.  This is what he wants and suggests how the Internet can be improved:

•Topics. Google Plus created somethings similar to that with Collections (without RSS, of course); or we could just create a blog or username for each of our topics – I think most of us won’t discuss about so many totally unrelated different fields. It’s a change of mentality – we shouldn’t write something just because we can. Unless we are celebrities, people, especially strangers, won’t follow us just for the sake of it – we need actual, quality content. Smallchat is fine on FB or Twitter.

 

APIs. I’m not saying we should get back to IRC or to NNTP. But we need a common API for Instant Messaging and forum-like software so that people can use their favorite tools to organize their data sources. Installing tons of apps or visiting tens of websites every day is not an option.

His rant is about the lack of a good app that digests the Internet into a single, serves reading list.  Franzoni really needs to try out the Feedly app.

Whitney Grace, July 28, 2017

 

Whose Message Is It Anyway?

April 11, 2017

Instant messaging service provider WhatsApp is in a quandary. While privacy of its users is of utmost importance to them, where do they draw the line if it’s a question of national security?

In an editorial published in The Telegraph titled WhatsApp Accused of Giving Terrorists ‘a Secret Place to Hide’ as It Refuses to Hand over London Attacker’s Messages, the writer says:“The Government was considering legislation to force online firms to take down extremist material, but said it was time for the companies to “recognise that they have a responsibility” to get their own house in order.

Apps like WhatsApp offer end-to-end encryption for messages sent using its network. This makes it impossible (?) for anyone to intercept and read them, even technicians at WhatsApp. On numerous occasions, WhatsApp, owned by Facebook, has come under fire for protecting its user privacy. In this particular incident, the London attacker Ajao used WhatsApp to send message to someone. While Soctland Yard wants access to the messages sent by the terrorist, WhatsApp says its hands are tied.

The editorial also says that social media networks are no more tech companies, rather they are turning into publishing companies thus the onus is on them to ensure the radical materials are also removed from their networks. Who ultimately will win the battle remains to be seen, but right now, WhatsApp seems to have the edge.

Vishal Ingole, April 11, 2017

Android Introduces in Apps Search

March 20, 2017

Android has announced a new search feature, this one specifically for documents and messages within your apps. With this feature, if you want to revisit that great idea you jotted down last Tuesday, you will (eventually) be able to search for it within Evernote using whatever keywords you can recall from your brilliant plan. The brief write-up at Ubergizmo, “Google Introduces ‘In Apps’ Search Feature to Android,” explains the new feature:

According to Google, ‘We use apps to call friends, send messages or listen to music. But sometimes, it’s hard to find exactly what you’re looking for. Today, we’re introducing a new way for you to search for information in your apps on your Android phone. With this new search mode, called In Apps, you can quickly find content from installed apps.

Basically by searching under the ‘In Apps’ tab in the search bar on your Android phone, instead of trying to search the web, it will search within your apps itself. This will be ideal if you’re trying to bring up a particular message, or if you have saved a document and you’re unsure if you saved it in Evernote, Google Drive, Dropbox, in your email, and so on.

So far, In Apps only works with Gmail, Spotify, and YouTube. However, Google plans to incorporate the feature into more apps, including Facebook Messenger, LinkedIn, Evernote, Glide, Todoist, and Google Keep. I expect we will eventually see the feature integrated into nearly every Android app.

Cynthia Murrell, March 20, 2017

Mobile App Usage on the Rise from 34% of Consumer Time in 2013 to 50% in 2016

February 24, 2017

Bad news, Google. The article titled Smartphone Apps Now Account for Half the Time Americans Spend Online on TechCrunch reveals that mobile applications are still on the rise. Throw in tablet apps and the total almost hits 60%. Google is already working to maintain relevancy with its In Apps feature for Androids, which searches inside apps themselves. The article explains,

This shift towards apps is exactly why Google has been working to integrate the “web of apps” into its search engine, and to make surfacing the information hidden in apps something its Google Search app is capable of handling.  Our app usage has grown not only because of the ubiquity of smartphones, but also other factors – like faster speeds provided by 4G LTE networks, and smartphones with larger screens that make sitting at a desktop less of a necessity.

What apps are taking up the most of our time? Just the ones you would expect, such as Facebook, Messenger, YouTube, and Google Maps. But Pokemon Go is the little app that could, edging out Snapchat and Pinterest in the ranking of the top 15 mobile apps. According to a report from Senor Tower, Pokemon Go has gone beyond 180 million daily downloads. The growth of consumer time spent on apps is expected to keep growing, but comScore reassuringly states that desktops will also remain a key part of consumer’s lives for many years to come.

Chelsea Kerwin, February 24, 2017

 

Bing Improvements

February 17, 2017

Online marketers are usually concerned with the latest Google algorithm, but Microsoft’s Bing is also a viable SEO target. Busines2Community shares recent upgrades to that Internet search engine in its write-up, “2016 New Bing Features.” The section on the mobile app seems to be the most relevant to those interested in Search developments. Writer Asaf Hartuv tells us:

For search, product and local results were improved significantly. Now when you search using the Bing app on an iPhone, you will get more local results with more information featured right on the page. You won’t have to click around to get what you want.

Similarly, when you search for a product you want to buy, you will get more options from more stores, such as eBay and Best Buy. You won’t have to go to as many websites to do the comparison shopping that is so important to making your purchase decision.

While these updates were made to the app, the image and video search results were also improved. You get far more options in a more user-friendly layout when you search for these visuals.

The Bing app also includes practical updates that go beyond search. For example, you can choose to follow a movie and get notified when it becomes available for streaming. Or you can find local bus routes or schedules based on the information you select on a map.

Hartuv also discusses upgrades to Bing Ads (a bargain compared to Google Ads, apparently), and the fact that Bing is now powering AOL’s search results (after being dropped by Yahoo). He also notes that, while not a new feature, Bing Trends is always presenting newly assembled, specialized content to enhance users’ understanding of current events. Hartuv concludes by prompting SEO pros to remember the value of Bing.

Cynthia Murrell, February 17, 2017

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