Factualities for November 21, 2018

November 21, 2018

Believe ‘em or not.

  • $1.17 million. Russian bank cash losses due to cyber attacks at Russian banks in the first eight months of 2018. Losses were down from $16.46 million in the same period in 2017. Source: Reuters
  • 4,300. Number of blockchain start ups in the world. More than 200 are in Israel. Source: No Camels
  • 35 million. Allegedly the number of US voter records for sale on the Dark Web. Source: TechRadar
  • One. The number of Google pop up hardware stories in Bucktown, Illinois. Source: ABC 7 Chicago
  • $2.2 billion. Size of the quantum computing market in 2025. Source: Site Pro News
  • 33 percent. The percentage of university historians from ethnic minorities who experience discrimination. Source: Independent

Stephen E Arnold, November 21, 2018

Factualities for November 14, 2018

November 14, 2018

Believe ‘em or not. I am not the least suspicious of round numbers.

  • 50 percent. Percent of WhatsApp users who do not know that Facebook owns the messaging application. Source: The Next Web
  • $100 million amount PwC (a consulting firm) will spend on training employees who are self starters. Source: Techcrunch
  • Less than one second. Time required to destroy a low end drone with a 50 kilowatt laser. (Your PowerPoint laser will be less than five milliwatts.) Source: Gizmodo
  • One. Rank of the US in economic competitiveness. Source: Next Big Future
  • Three years. How long an Apple iPhone will last. Source: Cult of Mac
  • Six percent. Growth in global Internet access growth, which was down from 19 percent in 2017. Source: Technology Review

Stephen E Arnold, November 14, 2018

Factualities for November 7, 2018

November 7, 2018

Believe ‘em or not.

  • 900 percent. Amount Facebook inflated its ad watching data. Source: Slashdot
  • $390 billion. Size of the global cyber weapon market in 2014. Estimated growth rate: 4.4 percent. Source; Transparency Market Research
  • 66 percent. Calculated segment of the US population which has
    heard about software robots. Source: Pew
  • $1 billion. The amount Massachusetts Institute of Technology will spend for its Schwarzman College of Computing which will focus on artificial intelligence. Source: Digital Trends
  • 2019. When Jeff Bezos will send tourists into space. Source: Recode
  • $45 billion. Amount invested in Softbank’s Vision Fund. Source: Quartz

Stephen E Arnold, November 7, 2018

Factualities for October 31, 2018

October 31, 2018

Believe ‘em or not. More satisfying, symmetric numbers from assorted data mavens:

  • 50 percent. The volume of government censor requests for censoring YouTube content.
    Source: Inquisitr
  • 800. Number of spam accounts Facebook purged. Source: SFGate
  • Zero. The number of times Google mentioned its Android operating system during its Made by Google 2018 keynote. Source: 9to5Google
  • 40,000. Number of facial recognition cameras monitoring 11 million uighurs in China. Source: Business Insider
  • 30 million. Number of DuckDuckGo searches delivered on one day in October 2018. By comparison, Google delivered only 3.5 billion daily searches. Source: Slashgear
  • 111 million active profiles on Google Plus in 2015. (This number will soon be zero because consumer Google Plus has been killed off by lax security and possibly interesting management methods.) For a point of reference, Facebook has two billion active profiles or 18 times the traction of Google Plus. Source: CNet

Stephen E Arnold, October 31, 2018

Factualities for October 24, 2018

October 24, 2018

Believe ‘em or not, especially the nice, round, chubby numbers:

  • 33 percent of US adults hit with identity theft. Source: DarkReading
  • 45 out of 50 companies illegally void warranties for electronics. Source: Reddit.com
  • 000000. Kanye West’s iPhone pass code. Graham Cluley
  • $50,000 per hour. Cost of Flying the F 35 fighter aircraft for one hour.
    Source: New York Times page A 19 October 12, 2018
  • 29 million people. Number of individuals probably affected by the September Facebook breach. Source: Facebook
  • 30 000. Number of US Department of Defense personnel records which may have been breached by hackers. Source: Cyberscoop

Stephen E Arnold, October 24, 2018

Factualities for October 17, 2018

October 17, 2018

Hey, hey, believe ‘em or not.

  • 33 percent of US adults hit with identity theft. Source: DarkReading
  • 45 out of 50 companies illegally void warranties for electronics. Source: Reddit.com
  • 000000. Kanye West’s iPhone pass code. Source: Graham Cluley
  • $50,000 per hour. Cost of Flying the F 35 fighter aircraft for one hour. Source: New York Times page A 19 October 12, 2018
  • 29 million people. Number of individuals probably affected by the September Facebook breach. Source: Facebook
  • 30 000. Number of US Department of Defense personnel records which may have been breached by hackers. Source: Cyberscoop

Beyond Search loves round numbers. So satisfyingly accurate-like.

Stephen E Arnold, October 17, 2018

Factualities for September 26, 2018

September 26, 2018

Believe ‘em or not:

  • 58 million. The number of new jobs artificial intelligence will create by 2022. Source: Forbes
  • 183.9. The top speed a woman reached riding a bicycle. Source: National Public Radio
  • 55 percent of millennials prefer learning via YouTube. 59 percent of Generation Z prefer learning via YouTube. Source: Axios
  • 71 percent. The percentage of startups in Israel focusing on business to business applications based on artificial intelligence. Source: Forbes
  • 557,000. Number of backlogged US security clearances in the last 90 days. Source: FAS.org
  • $783. Average monthly p9ayment of an Uber or Yelp driver in 2017. Source: Technology Review
  • 2.0 billion euros. Amount raised by startups in France in the first six months of 2018. Amount raised in same period in 2017: 2.6 billion euros. Source: Bloomberg
  • Everyone. The number of people Twitter will ask about its policy changes. Techcrunch.

Yep, numbers one can trust. Like “everyone.”

Stephen E Arnold, September 26, 2018

Factualities for Wednesday, August 15, 2018

August 15, 2018

Believe these items or not. We found them interesting:

  1. China has built 350000 5G cell sites; the US, 30 000
    Source: CNBC
  2. Five billion videos are watched around the world each day, with the vast majority of viewers being between 18 and 49-years-old. Source: Express tabloid newspaper
  3. Americans are now spending 11 hours each day consuming media. Source: Quartz
  4. Criminal activities account for just 10 percent of Bitcoin transactions. DEA via CCN.com
  5. Google will lose $50 million or more in 2018 from Fortnite bypassing the Play Store. Source: Techcrunch
  6. Baltimore will pay a person $176,800 to maintain Lotus Notes. Source: Baltimore Sun newspaper

Real or fake? A question smart software will have to answer. We cannot.

Stephen E Arnold, August 15, 2018

Facebook Versus YouTube: Understanding 13 to 17 Year olds

June 1, 2018

I read “Teens Have Abandoned Facebook”. The source is the Daily Mail, and I believe everything I read in the British tabloid. What caught my attention was the big usage gap, if the data are accurate. A couple of highlights:

  • In 2014, more than 70 percent of those 13 to 17 used Facebook. Today that usage figure is 51 percent. (Like most surveys, the nuts and bolts of the method are not provided.)
  • Also, teens in the sample voted with their eyeballs. More than 80 percent use Alphabet Google’s YouTube.
  • Finally, I learned that more than 90 percent of the 13 to 17 crowd own or have access to a smartphone, not a plain vanilla cheapo device. A smartphone.

The source of the data is the Pew outfit. Since I am not too interested in teenagers and their “usage patterns,” check out the write up.

Stephen E Arnold, June 1, 2018

More Poll Excitement: Information Overload

January 5, 2017

I read “Really? Most Americans Don’t Suffer Information Overload.” The main idea is that folks in the know, in the swim, and in the top one percent suffer from too much information. The rest of the ignorance-is-bliss crowd has a different perception.

The write up explains, reports, states:

A new report from the Pew Research Center says that most Americans do not suffer from information overload—even though many of us frequently say otherwise.

What’s up with that?

The write up points out:

Many people complain about the volume of information coming at us. But we want it. Adweek reported earlier this year that the average person consumes almost 11 hours of media per day. That’s everything from text messages to TV programs to reading a newspaper.

Well, the Pew outfit interviewed 1,520 people which is sample approved by those who look in the back of statistics 101 textbooks rely upon. I have no details about the demographics of the sample, geographic location, and reason these folks took time out from watching Netflix to answer the Pew questions, however.

The answer that lots of people don’t suffer from information overload seems wrong when viewed from the perspective of a millennial struggling to buy a house while working as a customer support rep until the automated system is installed.

But wait. The write up informs me:

the recent national election showed that “in a lot of ways people live in small information bubbles. They get information on social media that has been filtered for them. It is filtered by the network they belong to. In a lot of ways, there’s less information and much of it is less diverse than it was in an earlier era.” The public’s hunger for that information is reflected in a study conducted by Bank of America. The bank found that 71 percent of the people they surveyed sleep within arm’s reach of their smartphone. And 3 percent of those people hold their smartphone while they’re in dreamland.

Too much information for me.

Stephen E Arnold, January 5, 2017

Next Page »

  • Archives

  • Recent Posts

  • Meta