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Maverick Search and Match Platform from Exorbyte

August 31, 2015

The article titled Input Management: Exorbyte Automates the Determination of Identities on Business On (a primarily German language website) promotes the Full Page Entity Detect from Exorbyte. Exorbyte is a world leader in search and match for large volumes of data. They boast clients in government, insurance, input management and ICT firms, really any business with identity resolution needs. The article stresses the importance of pulling information from masses of data in the modern office. They explain,

“With Full Page Entity Detect provides exorbyte a solution to the inbox of several million incoming documents.This identity data of the digitized correspondence (can be used for correspondence definition ) extract with little effort from full-text documents such as letters and emails and efficiently compare them with reference databases. The input management tool combines a high fault tolerance with accuracy, speed and flexibility.Gartner, the software company from Konstanz was recently included in the Magic Quadrant for Enterprise Search.”

The company promises that their Matchmaker technology is unrivaled in searching text without restrictions, even without language, allowing for more accurate search. Full Page Entity Detect is said to be particularly useful when it comes to missing information or overlooked errors, since the search is so thorough.

Chelsea Kerwin, August 31 , 2015

Sponsored by ArnoldIT.com, publisher of the CyberOSINT monograph

Insights Into SharePoint 2013 Search

August 25, 2015

It has been awhile since we have discussed SharePoint 2013 and enterprise search.  Upon reading “SharePoint 2013: Some Observations On Enterprise Search” from Steven Van de Craen’s Blog, we noticed some new insights into how users can locate information on the collaborative content platform.

The first item he brings our attention to is the “content source,” an out-of-the-box managed property option that create result sources that aggregate content from different content sources, i.e. different store houses on the SharePoint.   Content source can become a crawled property.  What happens is that meta elements from Web pages made on SharePoint can be added to crawled properties and can be made searchable content:

“After crawling this Web site with SharePoint 2013 Search it will create (if new) or use (if existing) a Crawled Property and store the content from the meta element. The Crawled Property can then be mapped to Managed Properties to return, filter or sort query results.”

Another useful option was mad possible by a user’s request: making it possible to add query string parameters to crawled properties.  This allows more information to be displayed in the search index.  Unfortunately this option is not available out-of-the-box and it has to be programmed using content enrichment.

Enterprise search on SharePoint 2013 still needs to be tweaked and fine-tuned, especially as users’ search demands become more complex.  It makes us wonder when Microsoft will release the next SharePoint installment and if the next upgrade will resolve some of these issues or will it unleash a brand new slew of problems?  We cannot wait for that can of worms.

Whitney Grace, August 25, 2015
Sponsored by ArnoldIT.com, publisher of the CyberOSINT monograph

 

Sensible Advice on Content Marketing

August 21, 2015

Here’s a post on structured-content marketing that is refreshingly free of semantic search baloney. Tatiana Tilearcio at Synthesio shares what she learned from a seminar in, “Four Insights from a Content Marketing Crash Course.” The symposium, scheduled to be repeated in October in Connecticut, was presented by content-strategy outfit Content Boost. Tilearcio’s first takeaway promotes a firm foundation; she writes:

“Get Organized And Understand Your Goals Before You Create Your Content Marketing Plan.

Before you sit down to put together your strategic plan, you have to know the answer to the question ‘what’s the purpose for your content marketing, and what will it do to your brand?’ To do this, you need to first create a dream wish-list of what you would like to see for your brand. Next, you need to address how you want to go about enhancing your brand’s content marketing efforts and what your budget is. When creating a content marketing plan, or any marketing plan, a budget is essential. Without a proper budget of what your plan will cost, your ideas will never come to fruition. If you have identified all of this, then you are already well on your way to understanding what your campaign strategy is.”

The article also discusses blending efforts in blogging, social media, and email; co-sourcing content; ensuring users find value in gated assets; repurposing content; and the importance of strong titles. See the post for more details on each of these points. Based in Norwalk, Connecticut, Content Boost is part of the Technology Marketing Corporation, aka TMCnet.

Cynthia Murrell, August 21, 2015

Sponsored by ArnoldIT.com, publisher of the CyberOSINT monograph

 

Gazing Into the Crystal Ball for SharePoint’s Future

August 20, 2015

As soon as one version of SharePoint is released, speculation begins on the next. After all, it keeps the fun alive, right? While Microsoft has already redoubled its commitment to on-premises versions with its upcoming SharePoint Server 2016, experts still wonder what the future holds. Read more of the predictions in the Redmond Magazine article, “What Does SharePoint’s Future Hold?

The article begins:

“As we sit and wait for the general availability of SharePoint 2016 next year, members of the product team have already started to talk about vNext. Not as far as specific features, mind you, but commenting on the fact that Microsoft will continue to provide an on-premises version of the platform as long as the market demand is there . . . Microsoft recognizes that on-prem will be around for a long time, if not mostly in the form of hybrid environments.”

Users will no doubt be anxious to flesh out what “hybrid” really means in their environment. Additionally, security and ease-of-use will continue to be top priorities going into the future. To stay on top of the latest developments, stay tuned to ArnoldIT.com for an easy to digest rundown via a dedicated SharePoint feed. Stephen E. Arnold is a longtime leader in search, and provides an expert opinion in a one-stop-shop format.

Emily Rae Aldridge, August 20, 2015

Sponsored by ArnoldIT.com, publisher of the CyberOSINT monograph

Facebook Number One Security Compromiser         

August 18, 2015

While Facebook is a good way for a company to engage with clients and even “humanize” the business, according to Zerofox’s article, “Cisco: Facebook Scams Are Attackers’ #1 Choice For Breaches” Facebook is the number way for a criminal to learn about organization and hack into its system.  Cisco conducted a 2015 Midyear Security Report that researches how cyber criminals are exploiting social media to their own advantage.

The article describes potential targets as easy and click-happy:

Facebook’s 1.49 billion monthly active users make it the world’s largest nation-state, used by 70% of American each day. It is, for better or worse, a nation without borders. Adversaries exploit the social media giant for its sheer size and trusted nature, making it the medium of choice for both inexperienced and sophisticated network hackers alike. For the adversary, the barriers to entry have never been lower, and the targets have never been more trusting and click-happy.”

Other security organizations confirm the findings and some of it comes from people simply being too trusting such as accepting friend requests from unfamiliar people.  McAfee discovered that employees became cybercrime victims on social media over other business applications.

While Facebook might be the number one platform to attract criminals.  Twitter is used to attack government organizations and other popular platforms are also dealing with loads of fake profiles.  It does not come as a surprise, considering Facebook is now the “Walt-Mart” of social media information.  What types of scams are people falling victim too?  Is it just stolen passwords and information or are they giving their personal information away?

Whitney Grace, August 18, 2015
Sponsored by ArnoldIT.com, publisher of the CyberOSINT monograph

How to Use Watson

August 17, 2015

While there are many possibilities for cognitive computing, what makes an idea a reality is its feasibility and real life application.  The Platform explores “The Real Trouble With Cognitive Computing” and the troubles IBM had (has) trying to figure out what they are going to do with the supercomputer they made.  The article explains that before Watson became a Jeopardy celebrity, the IBM folks came up 8,000 potential experiments for Watson to do, but only 20 percent of them.

The range is small due to many factors, including bug testing, gauging progress with fuzzy outputs, playing around with algorithmic interactions, testing in isolation, and more.  This leads to the “messy” way to develop the experiments.  Ideally, developers would have a big knowledge model and be able to query it, but that option does not exist.  The messy way involves keeping data sources intact, natural language processing, machine learning, and knowledge representation, and then distributed on an infrastructure.

Here is another key point that makes clear sense:

“The big issue with the Watson development cycle too is that teams are not just solving problems for one particular area. Rather, they have to create generalizable applications, which means what might be good for healthcare, for instance, might not be a good fit—and in fact even be damaging to—an area like financial services. The push and pull and tradeoff of the development cycle is therefore always hindered by this—and is the key barrier for companies any smaller than an IBM, Google, Microsoft, and other giants.”

This is exactly correct!  Engineering is not the same as healthcare and it not all computer algorithms transfer over to different industries.  One thing to keep in mind is that you can apply different methods from other industries and come up with new methods or solutions.

Whitney Grace, August 18, 2015
Sponsored by ArnoldIT.com, publisher of the CyberOSINT monograph

Insight Into the Zero-Day Vulnerability Business

August 14, 2015

An ironic security breach grants a rare glimpse into the workings of an outfit that sells information on security vulnerabilities, we learn from “Hacking Team: a Zero-Day Market Case Study” at Vlad Tsyrklevich’s blog. Software weak spots have become big business. From accessing sensitive data to installing secret surveillance software, hackers hunt for chinks in the armor and sell that information to the highest (acceptable) bidder. It seems to be governments, mostly, that purchase this information, but corporations and other organizations can be in the market, as well. The practice is, so far, perfectly legal, and vendors swear they only sell to the good guys. One of these vulnerability vendors is Italian firm Hacking Team, known for its spying tools. Hacking Team itself was recently hacked, its email archives exposed.

Blogger Vlad Tsyrklevich combs the revealed emails for information on the market for zero-day (or 0day) vulnerabilities. These security gaps are so named because once the secret is out, the exposed party has “zero days” to fix the vulnerability before damage is done. Some may find it odd just how prosaic the procedure for selling zero-days appears. The article reveals:

“Buyers follow standard technology purchasing practices around testing, delivery, and acceptance. Warranty and requirements negotiations become necessary in purchasing a product intrinsically predicated on the existence of information asymmetry between the buyer and the seller. Requirements—like targeted software configurations—are important to negotiate ahead of time because adding support for new targets might be impossible or not worth the effort. Likewise warranty provisions for buyers are common so they can minimize risk by parceling out payments over a set timeframe and terminating payments early if the vulnerability is patched before that timeframe is complete. Payments are typically made after a 0day exploit has been delivered and tested against requirements, necessitating sellers to trust buyers to act in good faith. Similarly, buyers purchasing exploits must trust the sellers not to expose the vulnerability or share it with others if it’s sold on an exclusive basis.”

The post goes on to discuss pricing, product reliability, and the sources of Hacking Team’s offerings. Tsyrklevich compiles specifics on dealings between Hacking Team and several of its suppliers, including the companies Netragard, Qavar, VUPEN, Vulnerabilities Brokerage International, and COSEINC, as well as a couple of freelancing individuals. See the article for more on each of these (and a few more under “miscellaneous”). Tsyrklevich notes that, though the exposure of Hacking Team’s emails has prompted changes to the international export-control agreement known as the Wassenaar Arrangement, the company itself seems to be weathering the exposure just fine. In fact, their sales are reportedly climbing.

Cynthia Murrell, August 14, 2015

Sponsored by ArnoldIT.com, publisher of the CyberOSINT monograph

Teper Returns to SharePoint Division

August 11, 2015

SharePoint is a huge organization within the even larger corporation of Microsoft. Leaderships shifts are not uncommon, but they can often point toward something meaningful. The Seattle Times offers some insight into Microsoft’s latest shake-up in their article, “Microsoft Exec Teper Exits Strategy Role, Returns to Sharepoint.”

The article sums up the leadership change:

“Jeff Teper, Microsoft’s former head of corporate strategy, will return to the Office division he left a year ago. Teper, a longtime Office executive, shifted last year to corporate vice president of strategy, reporting to Chief Financial Officer Amy Hood. In April, he moved to Kurt DelBene’s team when that former Microsoft executive returned to the company to lead corporate strategy and planning.”

Teper’s earlier career is telling, as he led Microsoft’s move to Office 365. With the upcoming release of SharePoint Server 2016, users have been assured that on-premises versions will remain an option but that web-based services, including Office 365 features, will continue to shine. For continued updates on the future of SharePoint, stay tuned to the dedicated SharePoint feed on ArnoldIT.com. Stephen E. Arnold has made a career out of search and his work offers a lot of information without a huge investment in time.

Emily Rae Aldridge, August 11, 2015

Sponsored by ArnoldIT.com, publisher of the CyberOSINT monograph

A Call for More Friendly Enterprise Search Results

August 10, 2015

An idea from ClearBox Consulting would bring enterprise search results in line with today’s online searches. The company’s blog asserts, “Enterprise Search? We Need Some Answers on a Card.” Writer  Sam Marshall likes the way Google now succinctly presents key information about a user’s query in a “card” at the top of the results page, ahead of the old-school list of relevant links. For example, he writes:

“Imagine you want to know the time of the next train between two cities. When you type this into Google, the first hit isn’t a link to a site but a card like the one below. It not only gives the times but also useful additional information: a map, trip duration, and tabs for walking, driving, and cycling. Enterprise search isn’t like this. The same query on an intranet gives the equivalent of a link to a PDF containing the timetable for the whole region. It’s like saying ‘here’s the book, look it up yourself’. This is not only a poor user experience for the employee, but a direct cost to the employer in wasted time. I’d like to see enterprise search move away from results pages of links to providing pages of answers too, and cards are a powerful way of doing this.”

Marshall emphasizes some advantage of the card approach: the most important information is right there, separated from related but irrelevant data; cards work better on mobile devices; and cards are user-friendly. Besides, he notes, since this format is now popular with sites from Facebook to Twitter, users are becoming familiar with them.

The card concept could be enhanced, Marshall continues, by personalizing results to the individual—tapping into employee profiles or even GPS data. For more information, see the article; it utilizes a hypothetical  query about paternity leave to well-illustrate its point. Though enterprise search is not exactly known for living on the cutting edge of technology, developers would be foolish not to incorporate this (or a similar) efficient format.

Cynthia Murrell, August 10, 2015

Sponsored by ArnoldIT.com, publisher of the CyberOSINT monograph

How to Use Watson

August 7, 2015

While there are many possibilities for cognitive computing, what makes an idea a reality is its feasibility and real life application.  The Platform explores “The Real Trouble With Cognitive Computing” and the troubles IBM had (has) trying to figure out what they are going to do with the supercomputer they made.  The article explains that before Watson became a Jeopardy celebrity, the IBM folks came up 8,000 potential experiments for Watson to do, but only 20 percent of them.

The range is small due to many factors, including bug testing, gauging progress with fuzzy outputs, playing around with algorithmic interactions, testing in isolation, and more.  This leads to the “messy” way to develop the experiments.  Ideally, developers would have a big knowledge model and be able to query it, but that option does not exist.  The messy way involves keeping data sources intact, natural language processing, machine learning, and knowledge representation, and then distributed on an infrastructure.

Here is another key point that makes clear sense:

“The big issue with the Watson development cycle too is that teams are not just solving problems for one particular area. Rather, they have to create generalizable applications, which means what might be good for healthcare, for instance, might not be a good fit—and in fact even be damaging to—an area like financial services. The push and pull and tradeoff of the development cycle is therefore always hindered by this—and is the key barrier for companies any smaller than an IBM, Google, Microsoft, and other giants.”

This is exactly correct!  Engineering is not the same as healthcare and it not all computer algorithms transfer over to different industries.  One thing to keep in mind is that you can apply different methods from other industries and come up with new methods or solutions.

Whitney Grace, August 7, 2015
Sponsored by ArnoldIT.com, publisher of the CyberOSINT monograph

 

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